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B.C. Pires, a newspaper writer, has joined the list of injured innocents who discover the wrongdoing of their employers only after they are fired.

Maybe it is the Winston “Gypsy” Peters complex.

Or the Jack Warner syndrome.

Pires recently issued a scathing attack on Grenfell Kissoon, the strongman at Guardian Media, accusing him of poor business decisions and of being tight-fisted.

The writer, who was employed at the newspaper for six years, uncovered those negative traits only after being booted out.

B.C. Pires, a newspaper writer, has joined the list of injured innocents who discover the wrongdoing of their employers only after they are fired.

Maybe it is the Winston “Gypsy” Peters complex.

Or the Jack Warner syndrome.

Pires recently issued a scathing attack on Grenfell Kissoon, the strongman at Guardian Media, accusing him of poor business decisions and of being tight-fisted.

The writer, who was employed at the newspaper for six years, uncovered those negative traits only after being booted out.

He wrote a typically caustic epistle, ridiculing his old boss and even damning the decision to move the Guardian offices to Chaguanas.

It may have slipped Pires that CNN, “the world’s news leader,” is based at remote Atlanta.

Or that modern technology permits real-time media reporting from far-flung corners of the globe.

Or that Trinis, including journalists, have been clamouring for years for a business drift away from the capital city as one measure in easing the colossal daily one-way traffic flow.

Chaguanas – which, incidentally, is the fastest-growing business district in the country – is, to Pires, culturally and economically backward and defined by Food Basket’s car park.

He may similarly typify other national business groups that are moving away from the cluttered and seedy Port of Spain.

Furniture giant Courts is now erecting its Caribbean warehouse further south of Chaguanas.

After six years, Pires learnt that the Guardian is “a concentration camp” and pays its employees poorly.

He may, indeed, be correct in his analysis, but regrettably, the country learnt about those undesirable human resources characteristics only after his sacking.

There seems to be a slight credibility issue here.

The Guardian is 97 years old and deserves a fairer and less emotive analysis, especially from a notable national writer.

Such review may well uncover many more warts at the newspaper, but it would not be viewed as the hatchet job of an ego-wounded satirist.

Pires’ bitter review may raises concerns about the worthiness and objectivity of his other analyses over the years.

Equally, it was wrong to sack Pires – or any other worker – without proper notice and possible terminal benefits, as the ex-columnist claims was done to him.

Maybe when his self-esteem is less fractured, Pires would use his abundant talent to write a balanced critique of one of Trinidad and Tobago’s oldest literary and social institutions.

Pires is capable of such a study.

And Kissoon and the Guardian deserve such scrutiny.

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